Is Your Water Potable and Arsenic Free?

drinking water

A well water potability test is the least expensive water test you can perform and is well worth the money.

water-filtration

A well or water system may become contaminated with harmful bacteria and other organisms when the well or plumbing is open to the environment during construction, repair, if the well casing is deteriorated or damaged, or if the well is flooded.  When groundwater is able to get past the well casing it becomes the source of coliform bacteria making your water UNSAFE TO DRINK.

Bad Water Stalls Home Sale

A few weeks ago I received a phone call from Travis who was very concerned about his well water.

Oregon requires all residential home Sellers to perform a Potability, Nitrate and Arsenic test prior to any home being sold.

Travis’s well water test failed. His home could no be sold until the water was treated and made potable.

Fortunately for Travis, Pure Water Solution was able to provide him a money back guaranteed solution to his problem – a whole house system costing him only $1000.00.

The next morning my plumber and I arrived to fix his water issues which included a whole Big Blue 5 micron whole house sediment filter at no additional costs.  We then arranged for our full service environmental laboratory partner to draw a well sample for bacterial analysis, as mandated by the state of Oregon, for less than a $100.00 fee.

Travis called me soon afterwards to thank me and let me know that he had sold his property.  He told me he was so relieved when he got back the lab’s test result showing his water had now passed because of our water treatment system. The new home owner was delighted with a lifetime of trouble free sanitized house water with almost no ongoing maintenance.

Test your Water Regularly

I recommend that you do not wait until you decide to sell your home to perform a Potability test.  The test is easy to perform and you can either call or email us to arrange to have a lab specialist draw the water sample and perform the test for you.

Or you can easily do it yourself.  If you decide to do it yourself, you will need to drop by one of the two water laboratories located in either Medford or Grants Pass to pick up one of their free sanitized water sample bottle and testing instructions prior to drawing your home water sample at the sink or well pressure tank.

Some home owners test every year or every few years. We recommend if you have lived in your home for 20 years that you do a Potability test at least once to assure yourself that you do not have coliform bacterial contamination present in your well.

If your water fails the potability test (most wells in Southern Oregon will pass the test) you might try and shock chlorinate the well once. If not successful contact Pure Water Solutions for a treatment solution.

Test your Water For Arsenic

A second equally important test you should consider doing at the same time is a test for the presence of Arsenic.  This test does not require a special sampling bottle and can be drawn using a clean one quart glass or plastic water bottle.  A level of 10 parts per billion or greater exceeds the EPA guidelines and your water will require treatment to be SAFE TO DRINK.

If your test is positive for Arsenic, a simple one faucet under the kitchen sink reverse osmosis system will provide the least expensive solution.  We can also provide you with guaranteed whole house systems that will make the water flowing out of every sink and faucet contaminant free and perfect.

If  you are concerned or worried about the water in your home please…

Call Pure Water Solutions

541-890-2751
For a free onsite water test and no obligation consultation

As Southern Oregon’s most trusted and reliable company for water filtration an treatment solutions we are proud to provide service to the following Oregon communities:

Medford, Grants Pass, Ashland, Klamath Falls, Rogue River, Gold Hill, Shady Cove, Trail, Central Point, Eagle Point, White City, Phoenix, Talent, Jacksonville, Applegate, Williams, Murphy, Selma, Cave Junction, and Brookings.

Comments are closed.